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The Michelle Factor: Forget Jeremiah Wright. What Does Michelle Obama Think About America?

Posted by avideditor on May 12, 2008

It looks like Obama’s wife is just as bad as Jeremiah Wright. Read my previous post on Obama

Hugh Hewitt

Whether or not the issue of Barack Obama’s two decades under the spiritual direction of Jeremiah Wright remains an issue through the next six months, the views of the possible First Lady at his side will be part of this half-year’s discussion. 
Which is why we have transcribed a major speech she made in North Carolina on the Friday before that state’s primary vote, and why we have posted the audio of the speech here. 
Read it. Listen to it. This is not a speech from the mainstream of American politics. It is a radical critique of the country, and it is not the sort of assessment widely shared beyond the far precincts of the left. 
Here are just a few of the key assertions Michelle Obama makes: 
But we’ve also learned something else this year, something that we’ve all sort of felt at some point in our life, that we’re still living in a nation, and in a time when the bar is set, I talk about this all the time, they set the bar. They say look, if you do these things, you can get to this bar, right? And then you work and you struggle, you do everything that they say, and you think you’re getting close to the bar and you’re working hard, and you’re sacrificing, and then you get to the bar, you’re right there, you’re reaching out for the bar, you think you have it, and then what happens? They move the bar. They raise it up. They shift it to the left and to the right. It’s always just quite out of reach. And that’s a little bit of what Barack has been experiencing. The bar is constantly changing for this man. Raise the money? Not enough. Build an organization? Not enough. Win a whole bunch of states? Not the right states. You got to win certain states. So the bar has been shifting and moving in this race, but the irony is, the sad irony is that that’s exactly what’s happening to most Americans in this country. The bar is shifting and moving on people all the time. And folks are struggling like never before, working harder than ever, believing that their hard work will lead to some reward, some payoff. But what they find is that they get there and the bar has changed, things are different, wasn’t enough. So you have to work even harder.

And see what happens when you live in a nation where the vast majority of Americans are struggling every day to reach an ever-shifting and moving bar, then what happens in that nation is that people do become isolated. They do live in a level of division, because see, when you’re that busy struggling all the time, which most people that you know and I know are, that you don’t have time to get to know your neighbor. You don’t have time to reach out and have conversations, to share stories. In fact, you feel very alone in your struggle, because you feel that somehow, it must be your fault that you’re struggling so hard. Everybody else must be doing okay. I must be doing something wrong, so you hide. You don’t realize that the struggles of that farmer in rural Iowa are the same as the struggles as a city worker in the south side of Chicago, because we don’t talk to each other. And when you live in a nation with a vast majority of Americans are struggling to reach an ever-shifting and moving bar, then naturally, people become cynical. They don’t believe that politics can do anything for them. So they fold their arms in disgust, and they say you know, I can’t be bothered voting, because it has never done anything for me before. So let me stay home, let me not bother. Naturally, we as a nation get cynical. 
And when you live in a nation where people are struggling every day to reach an ever-shifting and moving bar, then what happens in that kind of nation is that people are afraid, because when your world’s not right, no matter how hard you work, then you become afraid of everyone and everything, because you don’t know who’s fault it is, why you can’t get a handle on life, why you can’t secure a better future for your kids. And the problem with fear is that it cuts us off. Fear is the worst enemy. It cuts us off from one another and our own families, and our communities, and it has certainly cut us off from the rest of the world. It’s like fear creates this veil of impossibility, and it is hanging over all of our heads, and we spend more time now in this nation talking about what we can’t do, what won’t work, what can’t change. See, and the problem with that kind of thinking is that we passed that on to our children, because see, the thing I know as a mother is our children are watching everything we do and say, every explicit and implicit sign, they are watching us. And our fear is helping us to raise a nation of young doubters, young people who are insular and they’re timid. And they don’t try, because they already heard us tell them why they can’t succeed. See, and I don’t want that for my kids. 

And this: 
But the truth is, right now, that little nugget of a dream that was my life is getting further and further out of reach for most Americans because of that bar constantly moving. You know, jobs like my father had those blue collar jobs where you got pensions, vacation, all that, they’re dwindling. They’re drying up. They’re disappearing, going overseas. And if you’re lucky enough to have a job, nine times out of ten, your salary’s not keeping up with the cost of living. Barack and I met with a family of railroad workers, union folks. They said for eight years, they hadn’t seen a pay increase. For eight years, zero pay increase. Eight years. No increase. Gas prices going up, food going up, rent, insurance, own a home, what’s going with the mortgages? That’s going up. It’s all going up, and salaries are staying stagnant. So no wonder that bar feels like it’s moving. And I don’t know how single parents do it. There are millions of them all over this country. Let me tell you, single parents love their kids, too. But it is almost impossible to raise a family of any size on a single salary. So now you’ve got single parents who have to double and triple shift, taking on two, three jobs, working all the time, and feeling like they’re failing because that bar is moving, because how on Earth are you going to work as hard as you need to to pay the bills and be at parent/teacher conferences, and sit down and do homework when a kid has trouble? How are you going to manage all that? Well, folks are not, and they’re doing it suffering in silence, blaming themselves for the fact that they’re not working hard enough. Maybe something’s wrong. 

The bar is moving and shifting on them, and it’s moving and it’s shifting with regard to education, because we all know that No Child Left Behind is not doing what it needs to do for children in this country. So now on top of all the other worries that families have, now they’re worried about education, because we all know that you cannot measure the success of a child by a single test. And if that were the case, I wouldn’t be here, because I was not a good test taker. How many kids do you know who are like me? Teachers don’t have the resources to teach, the freedom to do what they know that they need to do. So the bar is shifting and moving, and college is another ever-shifting and moving bar. Even when kids do everything that’s asked of them, do your homework, stay out of trouble, get good grades, take those tests, do well on them, many of them apply, got into the colleges of their choices, only to look at the cost, look at their family’s income, sticker shock, so they walk away from college, not because they didn’t get in, but they couldn’t afford it. 

And this:
And [Barack] has spent every ounce of his time running over the decisions in his head – do I…when graduating from college, do I work on Wall Street? Make a lot of money, that’d be better for me, or do I go work in a community as an organizer? Well, what did Barack do? He became a community organizer, working in some of the toughest neighborhoods on the south side of Chicago, worked for years in neighborhoods where people had a reason to give up hope, because their jobs had been lost, steel mills shut down, living in brown fields left by those closed steel plants, unsafe streets, schools deteriorating, grandparents raising grandkids. Barack spent years working with churches, busing single mothers down to City Hall to help them find their voice, building the kind of operations on the ground just like he’s doing in this race, block by block, person by person. Now you tell me whether there’s anybody in this race who can claim to have made the same choice with their lives. You tell me, but I think that Barack Obama is the only person that can claim that kind of choice. 
And finally, this bit of winsome humility: “So trust me, we’ve seen it all. Barack has seen it all.” 

Michelle Obama isn’t running for the presidency, but she is at center stage of her husband’s campaign, and her vision of America will obviously inform Barack Obama’s vision of America if he becomes president. 
And her vision isn’t one that most Americans share.

HT Docs Talk 

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Hussein’s Church Founded On “The Destruction Of The White Enemy”

Posted by avideditor on April 6, 2008

UPDATE: OBAMA LINKED TO TERRORIST

Hussein’s Church Founded On “The Destruction Of The White Enemy”: ”

bilde-11.jpeg
Illinois Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Barack Obama speaks during a services at Trinity United Church of Christ Sunday, Oct. 31, 2004, in Chicago

He always knew, he has long been a ‘passing for not’, racist.

The church where Sen. Barack Obama has worshipped for two decades publicly declares that its ministry is founded on a 1960s book that espouses ‘the destruction of the white enemy.’

Trinity United Church of Christ’s Web site says its teachings are based on the black liberation theology of James H. Cone and his 1969 book ‘Black Theology and Black Power.’

‘What we need is the divine love as expressed in Black Power, which is the power of black people to destroy their oppressors here and now by any means at their disposal. Unless God is participating in this holy activity, we must reject his love,’ Mr. Cone wrote in the book.

Mr. Cone, a professor at the Union Theological Seminary in New York, added that ‘black theology will accept only the love of God which participates in the destruction of the white enemy.’

Mr. Obama’s campaign, which for weeks has weathered criticism about inflammatory racial language by the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. at Trinity, said the candidate ‘vehemently disagrees’ with those tenets.

‘It’s absurd to suggest that he or anyone should be held responsible for every quote in every book read by a member of their church,’ said Obama spokesman Reid Cherlin.

‘Barack Obama is not a theologian, and what he learned in church is to love Jesus Christ and work on behalf of his fellow man, regardless of race, class or circumstance. This is a faulty and disingenuous approach to a church, and a flawed way to judge a candidate,’ he said.

Mr. Obama has been a member of Trinity, on Chicago’s South Side, since finding religion there 20 years ago under Mr. Wright’s mentorship. Mr. Wright married the Obamas and baptized their children, and a sermon of his inspired Mr. Obama to title his book ‘The Audacity of Hope.’

There is no evidence to date in any of Mr. Obama’s public comments or speeches that he espouses the radical features of the black liberation theology practiced at his church.

Critics say Trinity’s message verges on separatist philosophy and at the very least advocates exclusively for blacks.

‘The liberation theology and the black-values system to which his membership ascribe is a clear commitment to the social and spiritual enhancement of only the black race,’ the Rev. Corey J. Hodges, who is black, wrote last year in the Salt Lake Tribune. ‘Even more troubling is Wright’s use of the pulpit to perpetuate racial division.’

For years, Mr. Wright delivered sermons and endorsed articles in the church bulletin that called the United States and Israel racist regimes.

The bulletin’s ‘pastor’s page’ included essays that said Israel and South Africa ‘worked on an ethnic bomb that kills blacks and Arabs,’ compared Israel to Nazi Germany and quoted leaders of the terrorist group Hamas calling Israel a ‘deformed modern apartheid state.’

In a bulletin last year, Mr. Wright lashed out at the news media for scrutinizing the church, blaming ‘racist United States of America’ and ‘white arrogance’ for distracting the country from more important issues, such as the Iraq war and Hurricane Katrina victims.

The church declined to comment for this article, but the Rev. Otis Moss III, the church’s junior pastor, who took over for Mr. Wright, wrote in the bulletin in October that media conglomerates ‘operate with contempt and disdain for the black community, women, and people of the African Diaspora.’

Conrad Worrill, a leader of the Chicago-based National Black United Front, said attention directed at Trinity United demonstrates that racist attitudes persist in the United States.

‘Even if [Mr. Obama] did support some of the tenets of some of the ideas embedded in that theology, I still don’t think it has anything to do with his vision and his candidacy,’ said Mr. Worrill, whose organization promotes black political and cultural education and activism.

‘I think most black people would agree that what Jeremiah Wright said is the truth. … What we see playing out on the public stage is how black people still see America and the world and how white people cannot see the truth. It has nothing to do with Barack Obama.’

Mr. Wright, who recently retired as the church’s pastor after 36 years, defended Trinity’s religious views in ‘talking points’ posted on the church’s Web site (www.tucc.org).

‘To have a church whose theological perspective starts from the vantage point of Black liberation theology being its center, is not to say that African or African-American people are superior to anyone else,’ he said.

Mr. Cone recently told Forbes magazine that he doesn’t know how much Mr. Obama knows about black-liberation theology.

‘I’ve read both of Barack Obama’s books, and I heard the speech [on race]. I don’t see anything in the books or in the speech that contradicts black liberation theology. If he had it explained to him, I think he would [understand it],’ he said.

Mr. Cone calls his own teachings a fusion of teachings of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King.

In a debate last month with his rival for the Democratic presidential nomination, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York, Mr. Obama rejected the church’s decision last year to honor Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, who is known for anti-Semitic remarks.

The senator also disavowed some of Mr. Wright’s racist sermons after they were publicized in video clips on television and the Internet and on talk radio.

But in a March 18 speech on race, Mr. Obama said he could not sever ties with the pastor. He said Mr. Wright is like family and that the pastor’s outlook is scarred by civil rights struggles of the 1960s.

Mr. Obama said he was unaware until last month that his longtime spiritual mentor and friend used incendiary racist rhetoric in his sermons, such as denouncing the ‘U.S. of KKKA’ and proclaiming, ‘God damn America.’

Mr. Obama said rants against whites were never part of the Sunday services he attended.

‘I don’t purchase all the DVDs [of Mr. Wright’s sermons], and I didn’t read all the church bulletins,’ Mr. Obama said Friday on ABC’s ‘The View.’ ‘It’s not to excuse it.’

Mr. Obama said his mixed-race heritage — his mother was white and his father black — gives him a unique vantage point from which to help bridge the nation’s racial divides.

‘The church itself, though, is a wonderful, welcoming church. And if you guys went there on a Sunday, you would feel right at home,’ he told the panelists on TV’s ‘The View,’ most of them white. ‘You would see people talking about Jesus, and mercy, and sin, and family … and forgiveness.’

‘That doesn’t excuse what [Mr. Wright] said, but I do think it’s important just to put it in context.’

The Rev. Jane Fisler Hoffman, a member of Trinity who serves as a pastor in Southern California, said the Chicago church does not follow a radical doctrine, despite the angry words of Mr. Cone’s treatise.

‘It may have had some influence on what unfolded, but [Trinity] is a wonderful church, not a separatist church,’ said Mrs. Hoffman, who is white. ‘Anyone who tries to paint the church as hateful would be missing the mark.’

(Via avideditor’s shared items in Google Reader.)</

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CNN Spin for Obama

Posted by avideditor on March 21, 2008

CNN Spin for Obama: “On Anderson Cooper’s CNN blog, Roland S. Martin spins out of control in an effort to help sweep up the mess left from pastorgate. He claims that Rev. Wright was only quoting Edward Peck, former U.S. Ambassador to Iraq and deputy director of President Reagan’s terrorism task force. He is particularly claiming that the controversial sermon that the ‘chickens have come home to roost’ was a quote from Peck. He goes on to provide what I guess is supposed to be the quote in question. However, if you watch the very start of the video above, Wright says straight out who this particular quote comes from….Malcom X!

One of the most controversial statements in this sermon was when he mentioned ‘chickens coming home to roost.’ He was actually quoting Edward Peck, former U.S. Ambassador to Iraq and deputy director of President Reagan’s terrorism task force, who was speaking on FOX News. That’s what he told the congregation.He was quoting Peck as saying that America’s foreign policy has put the nation in peril:‘We took this country by terror away from the Sioux, the Apache, Arikara, the Comanche, the Arapaho, the Navajo. Terrorism.‘We took Africans away from their country to build our way of ease and kept them enslaved and living in fear. Terrorism.‘We bombed Grenada and killed innocent civilians, babies, non-military personnel.‘We bombed the black civilian community of Panama with stealth bombers and killed unarmed teenage and toddlers, pregnant mothers and hard working fathers.‘We bombed Qaddafi’s home, and killed his child. Blessed are they who bash your children’s head against the rock.‘We bombed Iraq. We killed unarmed civilians trying to make a living. We bombed a plant in Sudan to pay back for the attack on our embassy, killed hundreds of hard working people, mothers and fathers who left home to go that day not knowing that they’d never get back home.‘We bombed Hiroshima. We bombed Nagasaki, and we nuked far more than the thousands in New York and the Pentagon and we never batted an eye.‘Kids playing in the playground. Mothers picking up children after school. Civilians, not soldiers, people just trying to make it day by day.‘We have supported state terrorism against the Palestinians and black South Africans, and now we are indignant because the stuff that we have done overseas is now brought right back into our own front yards. America’s chickens are coming home to roost.‘Violence begets violence. Hatred begets hatred. And terrorism begets terrorism. A white ambassador said that y’all, not a black militant. Not a reverend who preaches about racism. An ambassador whose eyes are wide open and who is trying to get us to wake up and move away from this dangerous precipice upon which we are now poised. The ambassador said the people we have wounded don’t have the military capability we have. But they do have individuals who are willing to die and take thousands with them. And we need to come to grips with that.’

It is interesting that I didn’t see any quote at all in the above that says anything about ‘chickens coming home to roost.’Confederate Yankee fills us in on where the quote was more likely to have come from:

The most famous single citation of ‘The Chickens Coming Home to Roost’ was as an alternate title of the Malcolm X speech, God’s Judgement of White America, where X attributed the assassination death of John F. Kennedy to the historical evils of white America at that time.I suspect that is a far more likely source for Wright’s invocation of that particular phrase, especially when we consider the historical contexts of both Wright’s speech after 9/11, and X’s speech after Kennedy was killed.At best, Jeremiah Wright credits here a ‘A white ambassador’ for saying ‘Violence begets violence. Hatred begets hatred. And terrorism begets terrorism.’There is no support provided by Martin for the claim that Peck said anything about ‘chickens coming home to roost,’ or any of the rest of what he cited.

A small excerpt from Ace’s rant:

So, CNN: He was just quoting Peck, huh? Just putting Peck’s quote into ‘context’?Gee, funny how such a key quote — the one you claim lets Wright off the hook — is entirely absent from your lying article.

More from Confederate Yankee:

Wright does indeed invoke Peck, and in particular, where Peck invokes the specific Malcolm X speech cited above.In short, Martin is being duplicitous when he claims that Wright was citing Peck, he was instead citing Malcom X through Peck.

In the long run it doesn’t really matter who Wright was quoting. He spoke it and believed it. The only reason it matters is another example of dishonesty and bias in the MSM. Its an obvious spin.

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Rev. Wright on the “State” of Israel

Posted by avideditor on March 21, 2008

More of my post on Obama  

Rev. Wright on the “State” of Israel: “Hmmm…why put the word STATE in quotation marks? Click on the letter to enlarge:

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