Avid Editor's Insights

Obama’s Secret Santa Gift to the American Taxpayer: Raping the taxpayer for Unlimited Liability for Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae Losses

Posted by avideditor on January 4, 2010

Obama’s Secret Santa Gift to the American Taxpayer: Unlimited Liability for Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae Losses

One of those issues which is decidedly non-sexy and math-oriented that the public tunes out on.

Unfortunately giving the administration a free pass to further sock the taxpayer in the eternal cause of redistribution of wealth.

Happy New Year, readers, but before we get on with the debates of 2010, there’s still some ugly 2009 business to report: To wit, the Treasury’s Christmas Eve taxpayer massacre lifting the $400 billion cap on potential losses for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac as well as the limits on what the failed companies can borrow.

The Treasury is hoping no one notices, and no wonder. Taxpayers are continuing to buy senior preferred stock in the two firms to cover their growing losses—a combined $111 billion so far. When Treasury first bailed them out in September 2008, Congress put a $200 billion limit ($100 billion each) on federal assistance. Last year, the Treasury raised the potential commitment to $400 billion. Now the limit on taxpayer exposure is, well, who knows?

The firms have made clear that they may only be able to pay the preferred dividends they owe taxpayers by borrowing still more money . . . from taxpayers….

The loss cap is being lifted because the government has directed both companies to pursue money-losing strategies by modifying mortgages to prevent foreclosures. Most of their losses are still coming from subprime and Alt-A mortgage bets made during the boom, but Fannie reported last quarter that loan modifications resulted in $7.7 billion in losses, up from $2.2 billion the previous quarter.

The government wants taxpayers to think that these are profit-seeking companies being nursed back to health, like AIG. But at least AIG is trying to make money. Fan and Fred are now designed to lose money, transferring wealth from renters and homeowners to overextended borrowers.

Even better for the political class, much of this is being done off the government books. The White House budget office still doesn’t fully account for Fannie and Freddie’s spending as federal outlays, though Washington controls the companies. Nor does it include as part of the national debt the $5 trillion in mortgages—half the market—that the companies either own or guarantee. The companies have become Washington’s ultimate off-balance-sheet vehicles, the political equivalent of Citigroup’s SIVs, that are being used to subsidize and nationalize mortgage finance.

That’s why on Christmas Eve Treasury also rolled back a key requirement of the 2008 bailout—that Fan and Fred begin shrinking the portfolios of mortgages they own on their own account, which total a combined $1.5 trillion. Risk-taking will now increase, so that the government can once again follow Barney Frank’s infamous advice that the companies “roll the dice” on subsidies for affordable housing.

There’s important stuff I …’d out, but I can’t quote it all. Read the whole thing.

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